Harvard Reverses Decision On Chelsea Manning Appointment

The Institute of Politics at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government announced it is taking back its decision to make Chelsea Manning a visiting fellow.

After significant pushback from critics including CIA Director Mike Pompeo, Harvard reversed its decision.

The Washington Post reports on the latest development from Harvard:

Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government rescinded a visiting fellowship offered to Chelsea Manning, the former military intelligence analyst who spent seven years in prison for leaking classified government secrets, after the university faced forceful backlash from CIA Director Mike Pompeo among others.

“I now think that designating Chelsea Manning as a Visiting Fellow was a mistake, for which I accept responsibility,” Douglas W. Elmendorf, the school’s dean, wrote in a 700-word statement released shortly after midnight Friday.

Yesterday’s news about Manning:

The Washington Free Beacon reports:

The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University has named convicted felon and transgender activist Chelsea Manning as a visiting fellow at its Institute of Politics for the 2017-18 academic year.

Harvard’s announcement of its incoming class of visiting fellows at the Institute of Politics celebrates Manning’s inclusion as the program’s “first transgender fellow.”

Reacting to the announcement, former CIA Acting Director Michael Morell announced his resignation from his post at Harvard.

Fox News reports:

Morell, a former CIA deputy director who twice served as acting director, announced his resignation from Harvard’s Belfer Center was a result of Manning’s appointment, saying he couldn’t be part of an organization “that honors convicted felon and leaker of classified information.”

 

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