Jemele Hill Tweets Trump Assassination Reference

Former ESPN host Jemele Hill caught the attention of the Secret Service.

During President Trump’s State of the Union address this week, Hill responded to comments by a Twitter user by mentioning a reference to the assassination of Malcolm X.

The Washington Examiner reports:

Hill, who now works for the Atlantic, made the allusion to the minister and activist’s violent death in 1965 in reply to another Twitter user. That user had joked that liberal firebrand Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., should have shouted, “Whose mans is this?” during Tuesday night’s State of the Union address. That phrase, in popular culture, has come to denote a boring person.

“Nah, she gotta yell: GETCHO HAND OUT MY POCKET,” Hill responded in a since-deleted tweet.

Those words were shouted by someone in the audience of Manhattan’s Audubon Ballroom where Malcolm X was giving his final address. While his security detail was distracted by the commotion, the divisive figure was shot by three members of the Nation of Islam, the organization in which he once held a prominent role.

 

The Secret Service confirmed they are aware of Hill’s comments.

While the Secret Service is aware of the subject’s comments, we cannot confirm or comment on the absence or existence of specific investigations. We can say, however, the Secret Service investigates all threats related to our protectees,” the agency told the Washington Examiner via email.

 

Although the Tweet was deleted, Hill Tweeted an apology.

 

Hill is highly critical of President Trump and Tweeted her feelings about the president in 2017 calling him a “white supremacist.”

 

No matter what your feelings are about President Trump, assassination references are grossly irresponsible and justifies the attention of the Secret Service. 

 

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