NY State Bans Gasoline Powered Vehicles by 2035

The new governor of New York launched an aggressive effort to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the state by signing legislation that would ban the sale of cars and trucks that use gasoline to power vehicles.

New York Democrat Governor Kathy Hochul signed a bill banning the sale of vehicles that use fossil fuels for power by 2035. The move by the governor mirrors a similar effort being pursued by California.

The legislation targets cars and light-duty trucks. Bigger trucks have an additional ten years to meet the new state mandate.

CNBC reports:

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New York Governor Kathy Hochul signed legislation on Wednesday that effectively bans the sale of new internal combustion engine cars, off-road vehicles, light-duty trucks and equipment by 2035.

The governor’s office issued a press release, “In Advance of Climate Week 2021, Governor Hochul Announces New Actions to Make New York’s Transportation Sector Greener, Reduce Climate-Altering Emissions,” that describes the legislation.

Meanwhile, California is seeking to advance its timeline for zero-emission vehicles from 2035 to 2030.

Last year, one critic wondered what’s going to happen to gas stations.

Support for banning gas-powered vehicles has been building both domestically and internationally.

Democrats like Hochul are pushing an aggressive climate change agenda by using the force of government to dictate their political agenda.

Banning gas-powered vehicles is a typical Democrat action that focuses on the goal without regard to the consequences to their actions.

In urban areas like New York City, for example, how can the demand for charging stations be met?

Can the New York State power grid meet the new demand for electricity?

What’s the environmental impact of production and disposal of electric car batteries?

What’s the economic impact on car part suppliers and auto manufacturers?

Consumer preferences, not government, should drive the marketplace for products including gas-powered vehicles versus electric vehicles.